Discussion:
[lopsa-tech] mail server help
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David Lang
2015-01-12 03:44:46 UTC
Permalink
Ok, I have gotten myself in a bit of a situation with my personal email
server.
I've been running Postfix as a mail server for many years, it's currently
running on a CentOS 5 system. I've also been using pine (or alpine) to read
my email for decades. Well, it appears that Postfix may have a maximum limit
of 2G on mailbox size and I'm bumping up against it. The system itelf has a
1T disk with lots for ree space.
So, I need to overhaul how I handle email (something I've been meaning to to
for years now). I would like to convert to an IMAP style mail handling so I
can use something like Thunderbird for writing ad-hoc mail sorting. Currently
the mailbox and all the "folders" that things are saved in are in mbox
format. That should probably change to Maildir.
This server has been so stable for so many years that I've forgotten most of
what I learned about mail servers since I set it up.
So, I really need some help in figuring out which way to go and how to get
there. Pointers to good documentation appreciated.
It's almost certinly overkill, but I like to run Cyrus as the IMAP server.
Configure Postfix to deliver the mail to Cyrus for new mail, and then use alpine
to copy messages from your old mailbox to the Cyrus mail server and it will
"just work"

What I would do is to install Cyrus without worrying about changing postfix
first. No new mail will be delivered to it, but you can get all the
authentication, multi-domain stuff (if needed) and other things working (and
copy messages there via Alpine for testing), then once you are happy with the
way it's working, change the postfix config to deliver the mail to Cyrus via
LMTP instead of delivering it to local mailboxes. It's probably a one-line
config change or so in Postfix to redirect the mail.

David Lang

https://cyrusimap.org/

some quick google results that look useful.

http://wiki.centos.org/HowTos/Postfix+CyrusImapd+SASL

http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/Postfix-Cyrus-Web-cyradm-HOWTO/cyrus-config.html

http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/Postfix-Cyrus-Web-cyradm-HOWTO/cyrus-config.html
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Brandon Allbery
2015-01-12 03:50:53 UTC
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Post by David Lang
It's almost certinly overkill, but I like to run Cyrus as the IMAP server.
Definitely overkill. I used to do that; my excuse is that it was my testbed
for a departmental upgrade. For small setups, dovecot makes more sense.
Alpine is still the tool for migration from Pine to IMAP, though (and
possibly continuing...).
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Brandon Allbery
2015-01-12 03:57:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Brandon Allbery
Definitely overkill. I used to do that; my excuse is that it was my
Post by Brandon Allbery
testbed
for a departmental upgrade. For small setups, dovecot makes more sense.
Alpine is still the tool for migration from Pine to IMAP, though (and
possibly continuing...).
Ok, I have no idea how to use alpine to migrate. You've kind of lost me.
Alpine is a rewrite of Pine with IMAP support. So you can access your Pine
mailboxes as is, and also an IMAP server, and move messages etc. using the
Pine interface you already know.
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Brandon Allbery
2015-01-12 04:07:52 UTC
Permalink
Ok. I guess my biggest concern is how to migrate my inbox. Hopefully the
Dovecot and/or the Cyrus documentation will give me some clues. Like I
said, I haven't touched a mail server configuration in many years and that
was to configure greylisting.
IMAP servers don't really support "migration" as such, because the IMAP
protocol strongly discourages it. In particular, Cyrus uses its own folder
format that should only be managed by Cyrus itself (dovecot uses Maildir).
You migrate by using a mail client to create folders and move messages into
them.
--
brandon s allbery kf8nh sine nomine associates
***@gmail.com ***@sinenomine.net
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David Lang
2015-01-12 04:13:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Brandon Allbery
Ok. I guess my biggest concern is how to migrate my inbox. Hopefully the
Dovecot and/or the Cyrus documentation will give me some clues. Like I
said, I haven't touched a mail server configuration in many years and that
was to configure greylisting.
IMAP servers don't really support "migration" as such, because the IMAP
protocol strongly discourages it. In particular, Cyrus uses its own folder
format that should only be managed by Cyrus itself (dovecot uses Maildir).
You migrate by using a mail client to create folders and move messages into
them.
And migrating my overflowing inbox?
select a bunch of old mail (say everything > 1 year old) and tell (al)pine to
save it to a new folder (either another local mbox mail file, or a IMAP server
on a local or remote machine), then delete the messages that you copied. That
will buy you time to finish setting things up and you can then copy the
remainder.

David Lang
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Steve VanDevender
2015-01-12 06:45:27 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, Jan 11, 2015 at 11:03 PM, Matt Lawrence
Ok. I guess my biggest concern is how to migrate my inbox.
Hopefully the Dovecot and/or the Cyrus documentation will give me
some clues. Like I said, I haven't touched a mail server
configuration in many years and that was to configure greylisting.
IMAP servers don't really support "migration" as such, because the IMAP
protocol strongly discourages it. In particular, Cyrus uses its own
folder format that should only be managed by Cyrus itself (dovecot uses
Maildir). You migrate by using a mail client to create folders and move
messages into them.
IMAP supports migration just fine, in the sense that it provides a
storage-independent method for downloading messages from *and uploading
them to* remote folders folders. As long as you can set up IMAP servers
that can handle both formats, there are a number of tools that you can
use to move mail from one to the other, and let the IMAP sever back-ends
handle the storage format conversions implicitly. (Dovecot is a handy
choice for conversion between mbox and the other common Maildir format
since it directly supports both.) In configurations where you need to
handle very large folders I strongly suggest something like Maildir
because it has much better performance, although Dovecot's indexing
functionality can also get you a performance boost for some operations
on mbox folders.

In addition to moving messages by hand using Alpine or other common IMAP
mail clients, the PINE distribution used to come with a "mail-utils"
package that includes several command-line tools for manipulating IMAP
mail via the same c-client library that is used in PINE and Alpine.
I've even built auotmated tools using those. In addition there's a
bundle of Perl scripts called "imap-utils", and a shareware program
called "imapsync" that seems to be more industrial-strength, in case you
happen to have to do this alot.
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David Lang
2015-01-12 04:01:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Brandon Allbery
Post by Brandon Allbery
Definitely overkill. I used to do that; my excuse is that it was my testbed
for a departmental upgrade. For small setups, dovecot makes more sense.
Alpine is still the tool for migration from Pine to IMAP, though (and
possibly continuing...).
Ok, I have no idea how to use alpine to migrate. You've kind of lost me.
configure alpine so that it can both read your existing mail and your IMAP
server, select all mail from the folder containing your existing mail (;a) and
"save" it to the IMAP folder (as<select IMAP folder)

alpine doesn't care what systems or formats the source and destinations are, it
will happily copy the mail across.

Daivd Lang
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John Sellens
2015-01-12 04:13:12 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 2015/01/11 10:50:53PM -0500, Brandon Allbery <***@gmail.com> wrote:
| Definitely overkill. I used to do that; my excuse is that it was my testbed
| for a departmental upgrade. For small setups, dovecot makes more sense.
| Alpine is still the tool for migration from Pine to IMAP, though (and
| possibly continuing...).


I believe that the Pine mail client had IMAP support if not right
from the start, very early on.

In this discussion, I'm not clear on how Matt is currently accessing
his mail (direct from mbox, IMAP, POP), or how the mail is stored
on the server (mbox, maildir, etc).

But, if Matt's messages are to be believed, it looks like he is
already using Alpine to read mail (from the first message):
User-Agent: Alpine 2.02 (LRH 1266 2009-07-14)

I fear we might be giving Matt advice on how to get to an end point,
without knowing what the starting point is, and thus muddying the
waters more than necessary.

(My guess is he's already using IMAP, but I'm not sure I've seen
the current IMAP server mentioned. And the idea of Postfix having
a limit on the mailbox size seems unexpected to me.)

Hope that helps!

John
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David Lang
2015-01-12 04:26:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Sellens
| Definitely overkill. I used to do that; my excuse is that it was my testbed
| for a departmental upgrade. For small setups, dovecot makes more sense.
| Alpine is still the tool for migration from Pine to IMAP, though (and
| possibly continuing...).
I believe that the Pine mail client had IMAP support if not right
from the start, very early on.
In this discussion, I'm not clear on how Matt is currently accessing
his mail (direct from mbox, IMAP, POP), or how the mail is stored
on the server (mbox, maildir, etc).
But, if Matt's messages are to be believed, it looks like he is
User-Agent: Alpine 2.02 (LRH 1266 2009-07-14)
I fear we might be giving Matt advice on how to get to an end point,
without knowing what the starting point is, and thus muddying the
waters more than necessary.
(My guess is he's already using IMAP, but I'm not sure I've seen
the current IMAP server mentioned. And the idea of Postfix having
a limit on the mailbox size seems unexpected to me.)
I'm guessing that he has Postfix delivering the mail to local mbox files, and
something is compiled for 32 bits (resulting in the 2G file size limit)

David Lang
Brandon Allbery
2015-01-12 04:28:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by David Lang
I'm guessing that he has Postfix delivering the mail to local mbox files,
and something is compiled for 32 bits (resulting in the 2G file size limit)
Yes. And Alpine because Pine is long dead / has not been updated in many
years. (And I did get confused; I was thinking of Elm vs. Pine. Alpine is
the Pine rewrite with Unicode etc. support.)
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brandon s allbery kf8nh sine nomine associates
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unix, openafs, kerberos, infrastructure, xmonad http://sinenomine.net
Ted Cabeen
2015-01-12 07:43:27 UTC
Permalink
If you're trying to go mbox->maildir with IMAP, (Al)pine is probably the
best solution. Non-pine users would probably be more comfortable in
mutt, but either will do.

Backup your mboxes, then get the new mail infrastructure setup pointing
to maildirs. Make sure everything delivers inbound and outbound
properly with the IMAP/Maildir setup, then just open each of your backed
mbox mailboxes in alpine, and save over to the imap server. If you have
hundreds of mbox mailboxes, there's probably a way to script it with
procmail, but for just a few, (Al)pine will be easier for you.

--Ted
Post by John Sellens
I believe that the Pine mail client had IMAP support if not right
from the start, very early on.
In this discussion, I'm not clear on how Matt is currently accessing
his mail (direct from mbox, IMAP, POP), or how the mail is stored
on the server (mbox, maildir, etc).
Everything lives on the server, I ssh and run (al)pine locally to access
my mail spool locally, no POP3 or IMAP in use at all. Current mail
storage is mbox. Yeah, really, really old fashioned, the original
server was a 386 with 16M or RAM running Debian sometime in the mid to
late 1990s.
-- Matt
It's not what I know that counts.
It's what I can remember in time to use.
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Simon Lyall
2015-01-12 09:42:12 UTC
Permalink
Everything lives on the server, I ssh and run (al)pine locally to access my
mail spool locally, no POP3 or IMAP in use at all. Current mail storage is
mbox. Yeah, really, really old fashioned, the original server was a 386 with
16M or RAM running Debian sometime in the mid to late 1990s.
Sounds like what I have. If you are hitting a 2G limit you could just move
some of the older emails to a separate mail folder or 10 (perhaps 1 per
year or one per month) and still keep more or less the same setup. As long
as no single mbox file is too big it should be a problem. I have 200MB
mbox files that pine/alpine seems to handle okay (well they take a minute
to load)

A few months ago I did re-arrange me email so that the INBOXs were on an
imap server and I could read them on my phone. I found that there are a
*lot* of different HOWTOs for setting up IMAP, most of which were aimed
at a larger scale than just my personal stuff. You might find the write-up
I did close to the scale you need:

http://blog.darkmere.gen.nz/2014/08/updating-my-personal-email-setup/

alpine doesn't have any real problem with my INBOXs being in imap and my
older email being in local files.
--
Simon Lyall | Very Busy | Web: http://www.simonlyall.com/
"To stay awake all night adds a day to your life" - Stilgar

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Tru Huynh
2015-01-12 09:54:35 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, Jan 11, 2015 at 09:12:32PM -0600, Matt Lawrence wrote:
...
I've been running Postfix as a mail server for many years, it's
currently running on a CentOS 5 system. I've also been using pine
(or alpine) to read my email for decades. Well, it appears that
Postfix may have a maximum limit of 2G on mailbox size and I'm
bumping up against it. The system itelf has a 1T disk with lots for
ree space.
...
CentOS-5.11 x86_64 here
/etc/postfix/main.cf:
...
# 2011/06/23 - man 8 local
mailbox_size_limit=0
...

Cheers

Tru
--
Dr Tru Huynh | http://www.pasteur.fr/research/bis
mailto:***@pasteur.fr | tel/fax +33 1 45 68 87 37/19
Institut Pasteur, 25-28 rue du Docteur Roux, 75724 Paris CEDEX 15 France
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Smith, David
2015-01-12 14:28:14 UTC
Permalink
What file system are you using? The 2GB limit doesn't sound like anything related to Postfix (unless you set Postfix's mailbox_size_limit directive years ago then forgot about it).

(There's also another discussion about whether it's worth the time and trouble to run your own mail server these days, when outsourced email is cheap and often free, but most of the people on this list probably would run their own stuff regardless, for the fun or the experience.)

Does your "old" mail system support POP, or only local access? Somewhere around here, I've got a script I wrote years ago for doing bulk moves between mail servers, but it requires at least POP (and ideally IMAP) access to the source server. For that matter, if both source and destination are network-accessible you can just use something like MigrationWiz; it's well worth the ten bucks or so per mailbox.

David Smith


-----Original Message-----
From: tech-***@lists.lopsa.org [mailto:tech-***@lists.lopsa.org] On Behalf Of Matt Lawrence
Sent: Sunday, January 11, 2015 9:13 PM
To: ***@lists.lopsa.org
Subject: [lopsa-tech] mail server help

Ok, I have gotten myself in a bit of a situation with my personal email server.

I've been running Postfix as a mail server for many years, it's currently running on a CentOS 5 system. I've also been using pine (or alpine) to read my email for decades. Well, it appears that Postfix may have a maximum limit of 2G on mailbox size and I'm bumping up against it. The system itelf has a 1T disk with lots for ree space.

So, I need to overhaul how I handle email (something I've been meaning to to for years now). I would like to convert to an IMAP style mail handling so I can use something like Thunderbird for writing ad-hoc mail sorting.
Currently the mailbox and all the "folders" that things are saved in are in mbox format. That should probably change to Maildir.

This server has been so stable for so many years that I've forgotten most of what I learned about mail servers since I set it up.

So, I really need some help in figuring out which way to go and how to get there. Pointers to good documentation appreciated.

I also understand if you want to scold me for such laxity, but "the cobbler's children have no shoes"

-- Matt
It's not what I know that counts.
It's what I can remember in time to use.
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Brandon Allbery
2015-01-12 14:55:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Smith, David
What file system are you using? The 2GB limit doesn't sound like anything
Post by Smith, David
related to Postfix (unless you set Postfix's mailbox_size_limit directive
years ago then forgot about it).
ext3. I have other files larger than 2GB on the server, so I doubt it is
the filesystem,
Maybe you need to check if your alpine has the 2GB limit and chokes? If
it's 32 bit then I could see internal indexes failing on >2GB files.
--
brandon s allbery kf8nh sine nomine associates
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Smith, David
2015-01-12 15:19:44 UTC
Permalink
According to this RHEL bug: https://bugzilla.redhat.com/show_bug.cgi?id=428996
Postfix 2.4 (and below, presumably, including 2.3 which was packaged with CentOS 5) used off_t for file offsets, which appears to be a 32-bit value on CentOS 5 32-bit. So that probably is the root cause.

If you have the freedom to move to CentOS 6 or 7, or even a 64-bit install of CentOS 5, Postfix probably will start to behave again.

David Smith


-----Original Message-----
From: tech-***@lists.lopsa.org [mailto:tech-***@lists.lopsa.org] On Behalf Of Matt Lawrence
Sent: Monday, January 12, 2015 9:05 AM
To: ***@lists.lopsa.org
Subject: Re: [lopsa-tech] mail server help
Post by Brandon Allbery
Maybe you need to check if your alpine has the 2GB limit and chokes?
If it's 32 bit then I could see internal indexes failing on >2GB files.
Postfix bounced messages that would cause the inbox to go over the 2GB limit. That's how I found this problem and why I need to solve it today.

-- Matt
It's not what I know that counts.
It's what I can remember in time to use.
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John Stoffel
2015-01-13 00:09:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Smith, David
According to this RHEL bug: https://bugzilla.redhat.com/show_bug.cgi?id=428996
Postfix 2.4 (and below, presumably, including 2.3 which was packaged with CentOS 5) used off_t for file offsets, which appears to be a 32-bit value on CentOS 5 32-bit. So that probably is the root cause.
If you have the freedom to move to CentOS 6 or 7, or even a 64-bit install of CentOS 5, Postfix probably will start to behave again.
Matt> I certainly can move to CentOS 6 or 7, but that's a bigger job
Matt> than moving to Maildir and IMAP, particularly since I've been
Matt> meaning to add in IMAP support for years now.


I've gone through some of this hassle myself at home. I'm still
reading email using VM inside emacs, but I do have IMAP semi setup for
the kid's email. I just never made my transition over to it since I
too ssh in and just read email in an ASCII client. Which is getting
harder and harder to do since more and more email has images and such
which pretty much require GUI tools. Sigh...

In any case, procmail feeding procmail feeding dovecot on Debian has
worked really really well for me. Easy to do, secure, and I got away
from the insanity of Sendmail thank god.

In your case Matt, you have three options in ease of choice:

1. cleanup your inbox, archive off old emails. Can't be *that* hard.

Actually, why are you delivering directly to your mbox from
postfix? Shouldn't you be delivering into a spool file which is
then copied by alpine into your main mbox? This is how I have my
emacs VM setup working. This way I don't have to coordinate lots
of updates or file locking, esp for my email when I'm saving it.
It's much more of:

- fetchmail grabs email from my provider(s) and feeds to procmail.
- procmail filters and pushes mail into various folders. For
example I get a copy of all my kid's emails right now.
- the folders are purely mail spools, mail gets appended, or it
gets pulled out and the file truncated under a lock.
- mail is read from mailboxes, each of which has a mailspool which
feeds it.

2. upgrade to centos 7 (skip six at this point I think) and get a more
upto date set of tools. This keeps the exact same setup and
infrastructure, but gets the latest versions which gets rid of the
file size limitations.

3. Install and configure IMAPs using dovecot. Cyrus IMAPd is way
overkill for a small home setup. Securing it so that access from
outside your home network is another issue, and one that I've been
hesitant to do. Now I would just setup a dedicated IMAP VM to handle
all that. Maybe. Hard to know honestly.


In any case, this has been an interesting discussion. Please do a
writeup when you're done and share it with us if you can please. I'd
love to know your reasoning for various decisions, just so we can all
nitpick them for you. *grin*

Cheers,
John



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David Lang
2015-01-23 00:56:55 UTC
Permalink
So, once I managed to get postfix and dovecot dealing with my Maildir inbox
correctly, I moved on to the MUA step. Alpine did very strange things, so I
dropped it immediately.
what problems did you run into with Alpine?

David Lang
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John Stoffel
2015-01-23 02:17:33 UTC
Permalink
Its good you got this working. I'm curious what process you're using
for outgoing email so you don't get dropped into spam, and what you're
doing with reading email from your phone or other IMAP device?

I love using procmail to filter email, and sieve on an imap server
always seems like a bit of a step back, but that's probably because my
main mail client isn't amazingly IMAP aware.

I'm also now a firm convert to postfix for my mail handling needs, and
I've been trying to get it used more at work too. Just so much easier
and straightforward when compared to sendmail and it's baroque
syntax's, both .cf and .m4 suck.

John
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Josh Smift
2015-01-23 02:28:24 UTC
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JS> I'm curious what process you're using for outgoing email so you don't
JS> get dropped into spam, and what you're doing with reading email from
JS> your phone or other IMAP device?

Speaking of this, I recently ran into trouble because I'd set my outgoing
SMTP server on my mail client on my Android phone (K-9 Mail) to be the
mail server I generally use for personal mail, with Postfix doing
authenticted TLS and all; and I found that this had stopped working well,
because when I was on T-Mobile's data network, I ran afoul of some SPF
policy, causing my sent messages to be marked as spam by good spam-
filtering software. So, ok, I could use T-Mobile as my SMTP server when
I'm on their data network, but a lot of the time my phone is on a wifi
network of one sort or other, and I presumably can't use their SMTP server
when I'm doing that.

Anyone else run into this? What did you do?

-Josh (***@infersys.com)
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Ted Cabeen
2015-01-23 03:48:40 UTC
Permalink
I do this. I run a Virtual Host at Dreamhost (Although it could be one
a digitalocean, prgmr.com or whatever virtual hosting provider you
prefer) that acts as an inbound and outbound mail relay for the
IMAP/SMTP server I run at home.

It's a small postfix instance, with SMTP-Auth configured to authenticate
mail from my devices regardless of network. The postfix transports file
is set to relay all inbound email to my home server. Once a year my
Cable ISP changes my IP address, and I have to update the config, but
that's the main maintenance it needs.

The only change I've made recently is to setup DKIM on outgoing mail
passing through that server, which has helped with false-positives on my
emails to gmail and other providers.

I can share configs with anyone who wants them, if it's helpful.

--Ted
Post by Josh Smift
JS> I'm curious what process you're using for outgoing email so you don't
JS> get dropped into spam, and what you're doing with reading email from
JS> your phone or other IMAP device?
Speaking of this, I recently ran into trouble because I'd set my outgoing
SMTP server on my mail client on my Android phone (K-9 Mail) to be the
mail server I generally use for personal mail, with Postfix doing
authenticted TLS and all; and I found that this had stopped working well,
because when I was on T-Mobile's data network, I ran afoul of some SPF
policy, causing my sent messages to be marked as spam by good spam-
filtering software. So, ok, I could use T-Mobile as my SMTP server when
I'm on their data network, but a lot of the time my phone is on a wifi
network of one sort or other, and I presumably can't use their SMTP server
when I'm doing that.
Anyone else run into this? What did you do?
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Josh Smift
2015-01-23 19:46:00 UTC
Permalink
TC> I do this. I run a Virtual Host at Dreamhost (Although it could be one
TC> a digitalocean, prgmr.com or whatever virtual hosting provider you
TC> prefer) that acts as an inbound and outbound mail relay for the
TC> IMAP/SMTP server I run at home.

Ja, so this is not entirely unlike what I'm doing. The new problem I ran
into is that when I send mail through it from my phone, my phone has a
T-Mobile IP address, and ran afoul of
http://www.spamhaus.org/pbl/query/PBL1585192:

172.56.0.0/16 is listed on the Policy Block List (PBL)

Outbound Email Policy of T-Mobile US for this IP range:

It is the policy of T-Mobile US that unauthenticated email sent from
this IP address should be sent out only via the designated outbound mail
server allocated to T-Mobile US customers by their email provider
(Hotmail, Gmail, ...). To find the hostname of the correct mail server
to use, customers should consult the original signup documentation for
their email account or contact their email provider.

So, if I send mail from my T-Mobile IP address, through any non-T-Mobile-
approved server, this policy causes my messages to get tagged as spam.
(Because that T-Mobile IP address is in the Received: headers, I guess?
Maybe I'm mis-understanding the situation here.)

-Josh (***@infersys.com)
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Steve VanDevender
2015-01-23 20:09:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Josh Smift
TC> I do this. I run a Virtual Host at Dreamhost (Although it could be one
TC> a digitalocean, prgmr.com or whatever virtual hosting provider you
TC> prefer) that acts as an inbound and outbound mail relay for the
TC> IMAP/SMTP server I run at home.
Ja, so this is not entirely unlike what I'm doing. The new problem I ran
into is that when I send mail through it from my phone, my phone has a
T-Mobile IP address, and ran afoul of
172.56.0.0/16 is listed on the Policy Block List (PBL)
It is the policy of T-Mobile US that unauthenticated email sent from
this IP address should be sent out only via the designated outbound mail
server allocated to T-Mobile US customers by their email provider
(Hotmail, Gmail, ...). To find the hostname of the correct mail server
to use, customers should consult the original signup documentation for
their email account or contact their email provider.
So, if I send mail from my T-Mobile IP address, through any non-T-Mobile-
approved server, this policy causes my messages to get tagged as spam.
(Because that T-Mobile IP address is in the Received: headers, I guess?
Maybe I'm mis-understanding the situation here.)
Ideally, if someone is using the Spamhaus PBL to reject mail or as a
factor in spam scoring, they would be using it only for connections to
port 25 (and encouraging clients to use port 587 with SMTP
authentication for submitting mail) and only in relation to the client
IP address that is connecting directly to their mail server, not any IP
address that appears in Received: headers (in that case, even mail sent
from a T-mobile IP through T-mobile's mail servers would get treated as
spam). But not everyone who runs a mail server is careful about
thinking through the implications of their spam-filtering decisions.

You shouldn't be having this problem with any mail server you connect
to, since only some sites use the PBL.
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Yves Dorfsman
2015-01-23 08:33:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Josh Smift
Speaking of this, I recently ran into trouble because I'd set my outgoing
SMTP server on my mail client on my Android phone (K-9 Mail) to be the
mail server I generally use for personal mail, with Postfix doing
authenticted TLS and all; and I found that this had stopped working well,
because when I was on T-Mobile's data network, I ran afoul of some SPF
policy, causing my sent messages to be marked as spam by good spam-
filtering software. So, ok, I could use T-Mobile as my SMTP server when
I'm on their data network, but a lot of the time my phone is on a wifi
network of one sort or other, and I presumably can't use their SMTP server
when I'm doing that.
Anyone else run into this? What did you do?
Two issues I run into:

- setting up clients to talk to servers on port 25. It can work, but you are
supposed to use port 587. Some network block 25, also, if you only allow
authenticated connections on 587, then you can be less stringent on ip
restrictions, SPF etc...

- sometimes when going via cell data network, I wouldn't get a hostname at
all, and I was refusing connections when a forward lookup for the host didn't
match the ip. I relaxed a bunch of rules on 587, and that solved that.
--
http://yves.zioup.com
gpg: 4096R/32B0F416

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David Lang
2015-01-12 23:26:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Smith, David
Post by Brandon Allbery
Maybe you need to check if your alpine has the 2GB limit and chokes? If
it's 32 bit then I could see internal indexes failing on >2GB files.
Postfix bounced messages that would cause the inbox to go over the 2GB limit.
That's how I found this problem and why I need to solve it today.
You should be able to just use alpine to copy a bunch of mail to an different
folder and delete it from your inbox to keep things working in the meantime.

David Lang
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